Employability

Creating opportunities to enhance student employability online

Submitted by Eliza.Compton on Fri, 24/09/2021 - 09:05
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Students are more focused than ever on personal and professional development, given the recent dramatic reduction in traditional opportunities such as work experience or volunteering.

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Working online presents opportunities for students to develop their employability in the digital space. Ruth Donnelly lists how remote programmes can prepare them for the changing workplace
Teaser
Working online presents opportunities for students to develop their employability in the digital space. Ruth Donnelly lists how remote programmes can prepare them for the changing workplace

HE needs to follow tech companies’ lead and go ‘agile’

Submitted by dene.mullen on Wed, 22/09/2021 - 09:01
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This summer marked a decade since the US entrepreneur and software engineer Marc Andreessen famously predicted that “software is eating the world”.

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Universities need shorter cycles of learning and credentialing, such as eight-week academic terms and quick, stackable certificates, says Tom Monahan
Teaser
Universities need shorter cycles of learning and credentialing, such as eight-week academic terms and quick, stackable certificates, says Tom Monahan

How to ensure your mentorship programme isn’t one of the (many) bad ones

Submitted by dene.mullen on Fri, 17/09/2021 - 09:01
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Many early career researchers hear mentoring spoken of in hushed, reverential tones. It is, they’re told, something that changes people’s lives (professionally, at least).

Unfortunately, in many cases, it’s never something they experience firsthand.

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Structured mentorship programmes offer a non-judgemental setting in which to ask those pesky questions whose answers shape careers, says Lia Paola Zambetti
Teaser
Structured mentorship programmes offer a non-judgemental setting in which to ask those pesky questions whose answers shape careers, says Lia Paola Zambetti

Displaced workers deserve more than short-termism from universities

Submitted by dene.mullen on Wed, 15/09/2021 - 09:01
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When I was a graduate student in the late 1990s, the North American labour market was undergoing a profound (albeit gradual, in modern terms) shift. A still nascent but booming internet economy, expanding international trade agreements and the offshoring of industrial jobs led to mass factory and plant closures. 

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Institutions must stop and think before helping reshape the career trajectories of millions of workers, says Gangaram Singh
Teaser
Institutions must stop and think before helping reshape the career trajectories of millions of workers, says Gangaram Singh

Early career researchers can say no, too

Submitted by dene.mullen on Fri, 27/08/2021 - 09:00
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Saying no is a difficult academic skill − and one that shows maturity. A previous dean of mine used to ask the same question in every promotion interview to join the professorial level: “Can you name one thing to which have you said ‘no’ lately?” But academics and researchers should not wait until this point in their careers to start practising this mystical art form.

Standfirst
Coming up with a series of questions for ECRs about each ‘opportunity’ as it arises can help them decide what is worthy of their time, says Lucas Lixinski
Teaser
Coming up with a series of questions for ECRs about each ‘opportunity’ as it arises can help them decide what is worthy of their time, says Lucas Lixinski

Developing research skills post-pandemic: creating space for reflection and conversation

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Thu, 26/08/2021 - 10:00
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We are all navigating the post-pandemic higher education landscape as novices, figuring out what new skills are needed. For researchers, this centres around how to successfully engage with a world emerging from Covid-19 and develop their research capabilities. So how might institutions create an environment where skills development can be based on authentic reflections, conversations and practice?

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Three research advisers share advice on how institutions should support researchers to develop their professional skills and confidence post-pandemic
Teaser
Three research advisers share advice on how institutions should support researchers to develop their professional skills and confidence post-pandemic

Teaching the skills wanted by employers in 2021 and beyond

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Wed, 25/08/2021 - 10:30
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Traditionally many universities have designed new programmes led by the research interests of academics, with employer and industry consultation relegated to an afterthought.  

Programme specifications and module proposal forms have been tossed under the noses of random employers, asking for feedback on courses that are already developed. This has often been a tick-box exercise to demonstrate to the academic validating panel that employer consultation was sought, simply paying lip service to the critical need for employer engagement. 

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Dilshad Sheikh makes a case for universities to work more closely with employers to shape industry-relevant courses and expose students to more real-world practical training and assessment
Teaser
Dilshad Sheikh makes a case for universities to work more closely with employers to shape industry-relevant courses and expose students to more real-world practical training and assessment

Using tech to train students in creative problem-solving 

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Mon, 16/08/2021 - 09:00
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To meet the changing needs of modern workplaces, universities should look beyond teaching conventional problem-solving methods. With clever use of technology, institutions can encourage students to engage more creatively with solving real-world problems.

By 2025, the World Economic Forum (WEF) predicts that creative thinking and problem-solving will be among the top skills required within the workplace.

The question then, for higher education institutions, is: how can we best contribute to ensuring our graduates meet these employer needs?

Standfirst
Alison Watson explains how institutions can guide students in developing creative solutions to real-world problems, better preparing them for the demands of the future workplace
Teaser
Alison Watson explains how institutions can guide students in developing creative solutions to real-world problems, better preparing them for the demands of the future workplace

How to support students in work placements remotely

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Wed, 11/08/2021 - 09:00
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Cooperative education (co-op) is an educational model that alternates classroom learning with practical work experience. We have employed the co-op model to build up our student competencies with industrial partners and governmental agencies. The co-op placement generally lasts at least one semester, or 16 weeks, with the active participation of the job supervisor, the academic supervisor and the student who is assigned to work as a full-time employee during this time.

Standfirst
Duminda Jayaranjan and Maruj Limpawattana explain what institutions need to put in place to remotely guide and monitor students on work placements via digital channels
Teaser
Duminda Jayaranjan and Maruj Limpawattana explain what institutions need to put in place to remotely guide and monitor students on work placements via digital channels

Choppy digital waters lie ahead for many storied institutions

Submitted by dene.mullen on Wed, 04/08/2021 - 09:01
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The digital era is proving unnavigable for institutions that have taken far too much time priding themselves on their history and status. Inside their enticing redbrick buildings lie stale and rigid institutions trying to fight their way up a digital river but finding that they set sail too quickly without preparing for the challenges ahead. 

Standfirst
Traditional universities are too often led by the interests of lecturers rather than the employment needs of students or recruitment needs of businesses, says Dilshad Sheikh
Teaser
Traditional universities are too often led by the interests of lecturers rather than the employment needs of students or recruitment needs of businesses, says Dilshad Sheikh