Employability

Teaching the skills wanted by employers in 2021 and beyond

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Wed, 25/08/2021 - 10:30
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Traditionally many universities have designed new programmes led by the research interests of academics, with employer and industry consultation relegated to an afterthought.  

Programme specifications and module proposal forms have been tossed under the noses of random employers, asking for feedback on courses that are already developed. This has often been a tick-box exercise to demonstrate to the academic validating panel that employer consultation was sought, simply paying lip service to the critical need for employer engagement. 

Standfirst
Dilshad Sheikh makes a case for universities to work more closely with employers to shape industry-relevant courses and expose students to more real-world practical training and assessment
Teaser
Dilshad Sheikh makes a case for universities to work more closely with employers to shape industry-relevant courses and expose students to more real-world practical training and assessment

Using tech to train students in creative problem-solving 

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Mon, 16/08/2021 - 09:00
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To meet the changing needs of modern workplaces, universities should look beyond teaching conventional problem-solving methods. With clever use of technology, institutions can encourage students to engage more creatively with solving real-world problems.

By 2025, the World Economic Forum (WEF) predicts that creative thinking and problem-solving will be among the top skills required within the workplace.

The question then, for higher education institutions, is: how can we best contribute to ensuring our graduates meet these employer needs?

Standfirst
Alison Watson explains how institutions can guide students in developing creative solutions to real-world problems, better preparing them for the demands of the future workplace
Teaser
Alison Watson explains how institutions can guide students in developing creative solutions to real-world problems, better preparing them for the demands of the future workplace

How to support students in work placements remotely

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Wed, 11/08/2021 - 09:00
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Cooperative education (co-op) is an educational model that alternates classroom learning with practical work experience. We have employed the co-op model to build up our student competencies with industrial partners and governmental agencies. The co-op placement generally lasts at least one semester, or 16 weeks, with the active participation of the job supervisor, the academic supervisor and the student who is assigned to work as a full-time employee during this time.

Standfirst
Duminda Jayaranjan and Maruj Limpawattana explain what institutions need to put in place to remotely guide and monitor students on work placements via digital channels
Teaser
Duminda Jayaranjan and Maruj Limpawattana explain what institutions need to put in place to remotely guide and monitor students on work placements via digital channels

Choppy digital waters lie ahead for many storied institutions

Submitted by dene.mullen on Wed, 04/08/2021 - 09:01
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The digital era is proving unnavigable for institutions that have taken far too much time priding themselves on their history and status. Inside their enticing redbrick buildings lie stale and rigid institutions trying to fight their way up a digital river but finding that they set sail too quickly without preparing for the challenges ahead. 

Standfirst
Traditional universities are too often led by the interests of lecturers rather than the employment needs of students or recruitment needs of businesses, says Dilshad Sheikh
Teaser
Traditional universities are too often led by the interests of lecturers rather than the employment needs of students or recruitment needs of businesses, says Dilshad Sheikh

Collaborating with employers to create work-ready graduates

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Wed, 07/07/2021 - 09:00
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The pandemic has resulted in a new way of thinking about higher education – one that focuses on reaching individuals in their homes or personal study spaces. We’ve all been looking inward for the past year or so; focusing on how we can best package up and deliver lecturers, libraries, support staff and many more resources directly into the bedrooms, living rooms and makeshift offices of our students. We’ve been forced to self-examine more than ever before – looking at what services we provide, where we lead and where we can improve as institutions.

Standfirst
Paula Reilly explains how universities can work with employers and students to shape curricula and courses that better prepare graduates for the future workplace
Teaser
Paula Reilly explains how universities can work with employers and students to shape curricula and courses that better prepare graduates for the future workplace

Don’t be fooled – community outreach can be even better online

Submitted by dene.mullen on Thu, 01/07/2021 - 09:00
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Universities have long seen research as one of their main societal missions. And while research is clearly an important way that higher education creates and disseminates knowledge, it is only one path.

Standfirst
Covid and the move online made audiences even larger for our student-led social media workshops aimed at local businesses, say Dennis Olsen and Kristin Brewe
Teaser
Covid and the move online made audiences even larger for our student-led social media workshops aimed at local businesses, say Dennis Olsen and Kristin Brewe

Creating new internship opportunities: engaging employers to see the value in humanities and social sciences

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Mon, 21/06/2021 - 09:00
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Humanities and social science majors are frequently misunderstood, in Singapore as in many other parts of the world. The value of their education is regularly questioned, and many employers are unaware of the value such majors can bring to the table. They prefer to hire graduates with more explicitly “practical” degrees for jobs that humanities and social sciences students could excel in.

As a result, humanities and social sciences students are not typically considered for many organisations and roles, despite offering relevant and useful skills.

Standfirst
Jonathan Sim describes how he engaged with local employers to open internship opportunities to humanities and social sciences students who would not previously have been considered
Teaser
Jonathan Sim describes how he engaged with local employers to open internship opportunities to humanities and social sciences students who would not previously have been considered

Designing postgraduate education as a means of sharing and developing academic and professional knowledge

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Mon, 14/06/2021 - 09:00
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Postgraduate degrees are increasingly seen as a means of career advancement in the professions. A growing number of postgraduate courses are offered online, allowing individuals to access education from anywhere in the world, while remaining in employment.

Here, we share our views of what works in online postgraduate education and the potential benefits of our approach. However, there is no “one size fits all” and what we outline is not an easy undertaking, requiring effort from teachers with confidence, and academic and professional credibility.

Standfirst
Gill Aitken and Tim Fawns explain how to design online postgraduate courses that operate at the boundaries of the academic and professional worlds
Teaser
Gill Aitken and Tim Fawns explain how to design online postgraduate courses that operate at the boundaries of the academic and professional worlds

It’s a game changer: using design thinking to find solutions to the Sustainable Development Goals

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Fri, 11/06/2021 - 09:00
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As we march closer to the 2030 target date for the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), it is becoming more urgent that we engage young minds with these global challenges and demonstrate to them how they can have a real impact.

We developed Game Changer to engage students with the SDGs through the development of “impact-driven entrepreneurship”.

Standfirst
Rachel Bickerdike explains how using design thinking to find solutions to the Sustainable Development Goals can open up a new world of social entrepreneurship for students
Teaser
Rachel Bickerdike explains how using design thinking to find solutions to the Sustainable Development Goals can open up a new world of social entrepreneurship for students

After the gold rush: how to respond to the Chinese student downswing

Submitted by dene.mullen on Fri, 04/06/2021 - 00:01
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Over the past two decades, international student mobility has exploded, transforming both universities and national economies. While the rise of international education has been a global story, it does have one outsized player. China has accounted for the majority of international enrolment growth in the major English-speaking study destinations, with rapid economic growth, a large youth population and a shortage of university places fuelling a prolonged surge in outbound study.

Standfirst
As the country’s outbound study trend cools, student recruitment strategies must evolve – and there is no ‘next China’ to fall back on, says Matt Durnin
Teaser
As the country’s outbound study trend cools, student recruitment strategies must evolve – and there is no ‘next China’ to fall back on, says Matt Durnin