Curricula development

Decolonising the curriculum – how do I get started?

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Tue, 14/09/2021 - 09:30
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If you are thinking about decolonising your curriculum and wondering where to start, do no not worry, you are in the majority. Many people are supportive of the idea in principle but are not sure what to do.

Standfirst
Rowena Arshad provides pointers for any teaching academics considering how to get started on decolonising their curriculum
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Rowena Arshad provides pointers for any teaching academics considering how to get started on decolonising their curriculum

Bringing international and intercultural dimensions into your programmes

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Fri, 10/09/2021 - 09:00
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In an increasingly digital and connected world, the concept of internationalisation at home, by which students can learn and engage with global perspectives regardless of their location, is becoming more important. Even when students opt for local careers, their work will be impacted by increasing diversity in their own communities, by global developments and by events in other geographic areas. Introducing international and intercultural dimensions into university courses are therefore key elements that support students in their preparation for this future.

Standfirst
Jeanine Gregersen-Hermans and Karen M. Lauridsen address how educators may create an internationalised learning experience for all students by including global and intercultural dimensions in curriculum design and delivery
Teaser
Jeanine Gregersen-Hermans and Karen M. Lauridsen address how educators may create an internationalised learning experience for all students by including global and intercultural dimensions in curriculum design and delivery

Engaging with the world from your home classroom: tips for internationalising the curriculum

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Thu, 09/09/2021 - 09:00
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The internationalisation of teaching and learning has seemed, in recent months, to be almost synonymous with digital cross-border scenarios. Formats such as virtual mobility and virtual exchange have been widely adopted. No doubt, these can be highly engaging and inspiring formats. But they present just one way of internationalising the curriculum and providing all students with an international experience on their home campus.

Standfirst
Tanja Reiffenrath shares advice on giving curricula an international dimension that helps students develop global perspectives
Teaser
Tanja Reiffenrath shares advice on giving curricula an international dimension that helps students develop global perspectives

University leaders need to demonstrate an adaptive mindset

Submitted by dene.mullen on Wed, 08/09/2021 - 09:01
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It’s annual accounts season at universities. Up and down the land, a handful of university colleagues will have been straining their eyes on spreadsheets and bringing together the narrative that tells a story of how their university has performed over the past year.

Standfirst
With huge change ahead, leaders must be brave and accept that the right decisions may not always deliver the best spreadsheet results, say Alasdair Blair and Sarah Jones
Teaser
With huge change ahead, leaders must be brave and accept that the right decisions may not always deliver the best spreadsheet results, say Alasdair Blair and Sarah Jones

Place-based learning in digital universities

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Fri, 03/09/2021 - 00:01
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Standfirst
A discussion of how the exploration and understanding of a place can be the backbone of higher education teaching and learning, whether delivered online or in-person
Teaser
A discussion of how the exploration and understanding of a place can be the backbone of higher education teaching and learning, whether delivered online or in-person

Teaching the skills wanted by employers in 2021 and beyond

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Wed, 25/08/2021 - 10:30
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Traditionally many universities have designed new programmes led by the research interests of academics, with employer and industry consultation relegated to an afterthought.  

Programme specifications and module proposal forms have been tossed under the noses of random employers, asking for feedback on courses that are already developed. This has often been a tick-box exercise to demonstrate to the academic validating panel that employer consultation was sought, simply paying lip service to the critical need for employer engagement. 

Standfirst
Dilshad Sheikh makes a case for universities to work more closely with employers to shape industry-relevant courses and expose students to more real-world practical training and assessment
Teaser
Dilshad Sheikh makes a case for universities to work more closely with employers to shape industry-relevant courses and expose students to more real-world practical training and assessment

Cultivating creativity in higher education

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Thu, 19/08/2021 - 11:00
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Academics from the UK and the US discuss the role of creativity in higher education, its many forms and how to foster it through teaching and research
Teaser
Academics from the UK and the US discuss the role of creativity in higher education, its many forms and how to foster it through teaching and research

Using tech to train students in creative problem-solving 

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Mon, 16/08/2021 - 09:00
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To meet the changing needs of modern workplaces, universities should look beyond teaching conventional problem-solving methods. With clever use of technology, institutions can encourage students to engage more creatively with solving real-world problems.

By 2025, the World Economic Forum (WEF) predicts that creative thinking and problem-solving will be among the top skills required within the workplace.

The question then, for higher education institutions, is: how can we best contribute to ensuring our graduates meet these employer needs?

Standfirst
Alison Watson explains how institutions can guide students in developing creative solutions to real-world problems, better preparing them for the demands of the future workplace
Teaser
Alison Watson explains how institutions can guide students in developing creative solutions to real-world problems, better preparing them for the demands of the future workplace

Make yourself presentable

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Fri, 13/08/2021 - 09:00
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Too often at university, presentation skills are assessed but never taught. This is despite “skilled communicator” being among our core graduate attributes. Giving a presentation will probably be unavoidable for most graduates; it might be part of the recruitment process itself for their first graduate job.

Practise, practise, practise

You learn how to give a good presentation by repeatedly giving presentations. Students must present, get feedback and implement that feedback. Repeatedly.

Standfirst
Richard Gratwick sketches a course designed to develop students’ presentation skills, whether in person or online, using principles that are universal
Teaser
Richard Gratwick sketches a course designed to develop students’ presentation skills, whether in person or online, using principles that are universal

How to embed creativity more fully into university curricula

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Thu, 12/08/2021 - 09:03
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The 2020 Future of Jobs survey by the World Economic Forum asked senior executives from organisations around the world what skills were increasingly important for their workforce. Within the UK the top three skills cited were “active learning and learning strategies”, “analytical thinking and innovation” and “creativity, originality and initiative”.

Standfirst
Gareth Loudon highlights five key strategies to enhance student creativity through university curricula that encourage exploration and enquiry
Teaser
Gareth Loudon highlights five key strategies to enhance student creativity through university curricula that encourage exploration and enquiry