Feature article

It’s a game changer: using design thinking to find solutions to the Sustainable Development Goals

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Fri, 11/06/2021 - 09:00
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As we march closer to the 2030 target date for the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), it is becoming more urgent that we engage young minds with these global challenges and demonstrate to them how they can have a real impact.

We developed Game Changer to engage students with the SDGs through the development of “impact-driven entrepreneurship”.

Standfirst
Rachel Bickerdike explains how using design thinking to find solutions to the Sustainable Development Goals can open up a new world of social entrepreneurship for students
Teaser
Rachel Bickerdike explains how using design thinking to find solutions to the Sustainable Development Goals can open up a new world of social entrepreneurship for students

Professors, stop pretending that you never cheat

Submitted by dene.mullen on Fri, 11/06/2021 - 00:01
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Article

I recently read Cheating Lessons by James Lang, and this article is a by-product − that is to say, not plagiarism − of that book.

Standfirst
Academics should drop the holier-than-thou attitude and look at cheating from a student’s perspective if we want to understand and eradicate it, says Hamish Binns
Teaser
Academics should drop the holier-than-thou attitude and look at cheating from a student’s perspective if we want to understand and eradicate it, says Hamish Binns

How to design unforgettable class activities that help students learn better

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Thu, 10/06/2021 - 09:00
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Article

A problematic trend I notice when conversing with students is how many of them struggle to remember what they did in modules from previous semesters.

These discussions got me thinking about how to design learning activities that are unforgettable. Albert Einstein, among other figures credited with the quote, famously said that “education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school”. I want to ensure my students remember what they have learned from me, especially after all the hard work they put into the course.

Standfirst
Jonathan Sim shares teaching techniques designed to pique the emotions as a way to lodge key lessons more firmly in students’ memories
Teaser
Jonathan Sim shares teaching techniques designed to pique the emotions as a way to lodge key lessons more firmly in students’ memories

Let’s stop confusing what just happened with true online learning

Submitted by dene.mullen on Thu, 10/06/2021 - 00:01
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Article

To be clear, what we’ve all just been through with “online learning” is not online learning at all. It is emergency-use online learning (EUOL). We should be careful to call it what it is. Pretending that what we’ve experienced is online learning is akin to pretending the burger you just ate was filet mignon. Well, they’re both meat.

Standfirst
During the pandemic, decades of research and practice were tossed aside in a matter of days, says Ali Carr-Chellman
Teaser
During the pandemic, decades of research and practice were tossed aside in a matter of days, says Ali Carr-Chellman

It’s not you, it’s me: taking responsibility for student engagement and interaction

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Wed, 09/06/2021 - 09:00
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Article

Having heard a number of educators talking about a reduction in student attendance at live online lessons as well as limited interaction from those who do attend, we developed the following tips based on our experiences of online teaching, observing others and evidence-based continuing professional development.

Standfirst
Maia Forrester and Ian Lee share lessons in boosting student engagement and interaction when teaching online, based on their experience training medical educators
Teaser
Maia Forrester and Ian Lee share lessons in boosting student engagement and interaction when teaching online, based on their experience training medical educators

How do we rescue the reputation of blended learning?

Submitted by dene.mullen on Wed, 09/06/2021 - 00:01
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Article

Let’s get the elephant in the room addressed up front: times have changed and a return to “normal” is just not on the cards, not truly.  Blended learning – to a greater or lesser extent – is here to stay. 

So, how do we rescue the reputation of blended learning, which has been battered by students’ experiences of universities’ hasty response to the pandemic and become synonymous with low-quality content?

Standfirst
To convince students and stakeholders that blended learning is worth the full tuition fee, we need to tell them exactly how it will work, says Russell Crawford
Teaser
To convince students and stakeholders that blended learning is worth the full tuition fee, we need to tell them exactly how it will work, says Russell Crawford

Making the most of online educational resources: a case study

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Tue, 08/06/2021 - 09:00
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Article

Online repositories of educational resources have been developed gradually, usually by people who are passionate about their subjects. Some of them have built vibrant, collaborative communities of users. These online libraries and the communities they gather can support active learning and help inform our assessment tasks.

How can we develop passion in our students for a discipline? How can we come up with assessment tasks that help them master new skills?

Standfirst
Pascal Grange explains how online educational resources can be used to complement teaching and enhance students’ opportunities for learning
Teaser
Pascal Grange explains how online educational resources can be used to complement teaching and enhance students’ opportunities for learning

Never forget: your course is not only yours

Submitted by dene.mullen on Tue, 08/06/2021 - 00:01
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Article

Let’s start with a question for instructional designers and faculty members: when you last designed a course, how much time did you spend thinking about the role that each element in that course plays in shaping your college or university?

Standfirst
Too much of our instructional design undershoots the potential of higher education to improve not only individual lives but also the public good, says Robin DeRosa
Teaser
Too much of our instructional design undershoots the potential of higher education to improve not only individual lives but also the public good, says Robin DeRosa

How resetting motivations can help faculty achieve better teaching and well-being during challenging times

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Mon, 07/06/2021 - 09:00
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Article

Faculty have a marked influence on students’ learning and academic success through their teaching. During the shift from face-to-face to online learning, the importance of the faculty role has become even more salient, with students looking to their instructors for stability, leadership and support during uncertain times.

Standfirst
Faculty members’ personal motivations impacted their attitudes towards meeting the challenges of the pandemic, and in turn, their well-being and teaching quality, research suggests
Teaser
Faculty members’ personal motivations impacted their attitudes towards meeting the challenges of the pandemic, and in turn, their well-being and teaching quality, research suggests

Recognition of academia’s ‘invisible labour’ is long overdue

Submitted by dene.mullen on Mon, 07/06/2021 - 00:01
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Article

Meet Harry. Harry is an assistant professor, no tenure yet − hopefully in a few years. According to his contract, Harry is supposed to spend 60 per cent of his working time teaching and 40 per cent on research. Academic reality, however, tells another story.

In the past two weeks, Harry was part of a hiring committee (which took eight hours), contributed to a report on student evaluations (two hours), peer-reviewed an article (six hours), attended an editorial board meeting (two hours) and had a number of chats with students who needed extra attention (three hours).

Standfirst
We must ensure that academic citizenship becomes a key part of our job descriptions, on par with teaching, research and management, say Shari Boodts and Fleur Jongepier
Teaser
We must ensure that academic citizenship becomes a key part of our job descriptions, on par with teaching, research and management, say Shari Boodts and Fleur Jongepier